14 Sep

Research and Innovation

LSA is embedding research into each of our programs to stay at the forefront of human service delivery

Below are some of the research efforts being made in our programs. The goal is to deepen our understanding of the community and to continue improving our services to help families move past the barriers to well-being that result from poverty.

Early Learning

New York University is working with families in the Parenting and Child Development program to research family makeup and its impact on parent-child bonding and language development. The aim is to create and pilot a new intervention program that will promote parent-child language interactions during common, everyday activities at home.

Greening and Asthma Prevention

The Environmental Health program is participating in several national and local studies that investigate the relationship between environment and public health. One study evaluates the health benefits of renovating affordable housing with “green” materials and technologies. Another study is looking into the impact of asthma management support for high-risk adult asthmatics. Finally, in partnership with Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the New York Academy of Medicine, the program is participating in a study focused on the prevention and control of mold, which can trigger asthma symptoms and other adverse health conditions.

Reaching Immigrants

In 2016, our Advocacy program partnered with the Mexican Initiative for Deferred Action (MIDA) to do grassroots outreach in the community in order to provide immigration resources to eligible individuals. Data was collected to learn how DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) affects the lives of those who obtain it.

Tracking Health Trends

Two MD-MPH students from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai are looking at Nursing data from 2012 to 2015 to help us understand health trends in our patient population. Thanks to a grant from the Sills Foundation, LSA embarked on a 3-year capacity-building ​project to develop agency-wide​ and program specific​ ​metrics to better measure ​impact and to implement best practices in the use of data systems​ to capture key information. ​


Photo caption: In 2016, LSA nurses made 860 home visits to provide prenatal and post-partum care.  Photo by Micah Rubin.

11 Dec

NY1 Noticias: Asma en NYC

NY1Noticias with Ray Lopez

La comunidad latina es la que más acude al hospital por el asma en NY

In NY, the Latino community has the highest rate of asthma-related hospital visits

Thursday, December 10, 2015 – NY1 Noticias reporter Jessica Cruz-Gharnit inteviewed Ray Lopez, our Director of Environmental Health Services, about the high rates of asthma in the Latino community and what families can do.

2015-12-11 NY1Noticias

La comunidad latina es la que más acude al hospital por el asma en NY

30 Oct

Environmental Justice: Reducing Asthma Triggers

LSA’s Ray López and Amanda López are co-authors of a recent article on reducing childhood asthma triggers in public housing.  As reported in the journal Environmental Justice, children with asthma living in low-income, urban public housing had significantly fewer visits to the emergency department (ED), less use of rescue medication, and less disrupted sleep with a program that combines home repairs to reduce asthma triggers, training, and comprehensive care, called Controlling Asthma Through Home Remediation.

Reducing Childhood Asthma Triggers in Public Housing: Implementation and Outcomes from an East Harlem Community Health Worker Program

López Ray, Chantarat Tongtan, Bozack Anne, López Amanda, and Weiss Linda. Environmental Justice. October 2015, 8(5): 185-191. doi:10.1089/env.2015.0017.

Published in Volume: 8 Issue 5: October 22, 2015

ABSTRACT

There are significant disparities in asthma prevalence and management in New York City (NYC). Children living in the low income, largely minority neighborhood of East Harlem are almost 13 times more likely to have an asthma related emergency department visit compared to children on the Upper East Side, an adjacent high income neighborhood. The disparities in asthma prevalence and control are in part attributable to environmental conditions, including housing, which in low-income communities is often poorly maintained, resulting in mold, pests, and other asthma triggers. Controlling Asthma through Home Remediation (CAHR), a program of LSA Family Health Service (LSAFHS), offers remediation and repair, training, and comprehensive case management to East Harlem families that have children with severe and/or persistent asthma and live in NYC Housing Authority (NYCHA) public housing. Preliminary findings, based on pre-post assessments of 60 CAHR children, include statistically significant reductions in nighttime awakenings, emergency department visits, and rescue medication use. There were reductions in daytime asthma symptoms and improvements in household conditions; however, they were not statistically significant. Recognizing the limited reach of individual level services, LSAFHS also advocates for system-wide changes across NYCHA. Citing the Americans with Disabilities Act and its relevance to individuals with asthma, LSAFHS, in partnership with other community-based organizations and public interest attorneys, reached a settlement with NYCHA in 2013 that resulted in policy changes mandating expedited repairs of leaks, mold, and related issues. Monitoring the impact of these changes is ongoing. A hope is for replication of advocacy efforts in other cities.

Read the full article on Environmental Justice

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