10 Nov

Maternal Health Study

Maternal Health Nursing

Mount Sinai Medical Students Study LSA Maternal Health Data

How are we doing? What’s changing? Where are we going? These are the kinds of questions medical students are trying to answer as they examine maternal health data from the Nursing program at LSA Family Health Service.

The agency’s nurses treat prenatal and postpartum mothers and their babies who have been referred by their doctors for ongoing care. Over the last five years, medical students from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have been culling data to understand the impact of the program on the health of mothers and babies.


“We can use the data to try to develop more services and interventions for the women.”


The research takes into consideration a range of health and social factors, such as gestational age, birth weight, mental health risk, diabetes and food insecurity. For example, more than a third of mothers reported that they have no one to call in times of crisis. Recognizing the high rate of social isolation can help our nurses better understand how to support the mental health of mothers in the program.

“This is a program evaluation to look at the high risk population served and the importance of the program in impacting the lives of women who have no one to turn to other than LSA,” said Dr. Elizabeth Garland of Mount Sinai. Dr. Garland is the Division Director for Preventive Medicine and Community Health and manages the maternal health research initiative.

Dr. Garland stressed the value of looking at data over a number of years to uncover health trends in the community. For example, our nurses knew that they were seeing more and more complex cases. The data shows that this is quantifiably the case, with increased rates of preeclampsia and cases with multiple diagnoses. “We can use the data to try to develop more services and interventions for the women,” said Dr. Garland.

The rich data has been presented at many national pediatric meetings, most recently at the New York State Pediatric Advocacy Coalition annual conference. Ultimately, the goal is to better serve mothers in our community and share what we’ve learned with others.

Photo by Micah Rubin

10 May

National Nurses Week and Q&A with Jennifer Chaparro

We Salute our Nurses During National Nurses Week!

May 6-12 is National Nurses Week.  At LSA, we have a fantastic team of home visiting nurses who go above and beyond to improve family health.   We salute our nurses and thank them for their dedication to serving the community!

Above: LSA’s nurses – Suzanne Deliee, Brigida Lapadula, Susanne Lachapelle, Patricia Hayes and Jennifer Chaparro.


In honor of National Nurses Week, we asked Community Health Nurse Jennifer Chaparro to share some of her thoughts about nursing.

Q&A with Jennifer Chaparro RN, BSN – Community Health Nurse at LSA

What is a typical day like for you?

A typical day for a community health nurse is anything but typical.  In a nutshell, regular tasks that I find myself doing every week include completing routine paperwork, communicating with healthcare providers and insurance companies, and the bulk of my time involves visiting patients in their homes.

What is a typical home visit like?

A community health nurse can never know what to expect when visiting a new patient.  Each patient is a unique individual: culturally, emotionally, socially, and physically.  This is just as true for their healthcare needs: one person’s health needs differ completely from another’s.

At LSA, we see a wide array of patients.  We provide home visits for newly postpartum mothers and their infants.  We provide health assessment and monitoring, newborn education and breastfeeding support.  In addition, we provide wound care to children and adults, help families manage their child’s asthma medications and symptoms, and help women manage their blood pressure after experiencing severe preeclampsia.  We see extremely premature infants requiring cardiac surgeries and older adults who are wheelchair bound and need education in managing their diabetes — and every patient in between!

The ultimate goal of the home visits is to provide health monitoring, education and support to families in order to promote stabilization of their immediate health concerns and foster independence and successful self-management of their long-term healthcare needs.


“It is truly a blessing to be able to tend to these premature babies, helping educate their parents on how to care for them, and easing any fears or anxieties they have regarding the future of their babies.”


How do visiting nurses make a difference in the lives of the people they help?

Visiting nurses provide another means of support, especially for underserved families in our community.  People can become lost in the ever-changing, complex healthcare system, whether it be due to a language or cultural barrier, lack of education, or issues with insurance or documentation status.  This, in turn, can lead to a mismanagement of their health and an increased incidence of preventable complications, which can further lead to unnecessary hospitalizations.  By providing nursing visits in the patient’s home, visiting nurses can help to identify barriers that are preventing a patient from reaching their healthcare goals, while also providing compassionate care and education that is free of bias or prejudice.  It is important that patients have the opportunity to learn about what they can do to take better care of their health and that of their families.

How does being a nurse enrich your life?

Being a nurse enriches my life by providing me with new experiences and learning opportunities every single day. With every new patient comes a unique diagnosis or health problem.  At times, these health problems can be serious or rare, which requires me to do intense research so that I can be better prepared to provide accurate information for the patients that are affected.  These new experiences allow me to expand my knowledge and be well-rounded in my field so that I can help to educate patients who are affected by all kinds of health issues.  New information, diagnoses, and treatments are being discovered on a daily basis in the evolving world of healthcare, and it is crucial for nurses to remain up-to-date in order to provide the best education and support for our patients.  The learning never stops!

I have so many stories of my interactions with my patients that it’s difficult to just choose one.  Personally, I enjoy visiting first-time mothers and their infants.  Some of these moms are young teenagers, still children themselves thrust into motherhood at a young age.  Helping to educate these teens to transition into motherhood while also watching their beautiful children grow makes me feel so grateful that I am able to share this experience with them.  Helping to ease their fears, educating them on newborn health, and watching these teens become supportive young mothers makes me very happy that I can be a part of this process.

I also enjoy my interactions with premature babies.  A lot of premature infants have serious medical issues that need to be monitored or complications that need meticulous care.  These babies can be born in the hospital weighing a mere one or two pounds and remain hospitalized for weeks, even months.  It is truly a blessing to be able to tend to these premature babies, helping educate their parents on how to care for them, and easing any fears or anxieties they have regarding the future of their babies.  I especially love seeing them towards the end of care, watching the transformation the babies undergo from weak, fragile infants into bubbly, bouncy, happy babies.  Seeing the pleasure and expertise that their parents’ accumulate over the course of several weeks of home visits is just another added bonus to the experience.

17 Nov

Baby Shower

A celebration of the completion of the Fall Breastfeeding Class for new and expecting mothers, through our Nursing program.

Breastfeeding classes are offered several times throughout the year. New and expecting mothers:
– Learn and share experiences.
– Clear their minds of doubts and worries about pregnancy and postpartum.
– Become informed about the importance and benefits of breastfeeding their babies.

The course consists of 5 sessions ending with a baby shower at which each mother receives gifts to aid in the care of her baby and a certificate of completion of the course. Courses are led by our experienced nurses at LSA Family Health Service.

Breakfast and childcare provided.

Registration is through the LSA Nursing Program. Call 646-672-5200.